Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World

Written and Illustrated by: Rachel Ignotofsky

For Ages: 4 and up

Language: English

Topics Covered: Science, Scientific discoveries, Unsung heroes

Summary: This book highlights little-known women in science throughout history. Each page features one of Ignotofsky’s fun illustrations with a single page summary of that scientist’s achievements. Written in an approachable way for young children, this book will both inspire and teach a future generation of scientists! Some strong women featured are: Annie Easley, Mae Jemison, Mamie Phipps Clark, and Grace Hopper.

Reflection Questions:

  • Do you like science? What sorts of topics would you like to know more about?
  • Which one of these scientists would you like to know more about?
  • Do you know anyone that’s a scientist? What have they told you about their job?

Continuing the Conversation:

  • Are any of these scientists from nearby your community? How can you learn more about their lives?
  • Do some science experiments of your own!
  • Have a scientist visit your classroom and talk about what it’s like to do research and experiment for their job.

About the Author & the Illustrator:

rachel ignotofskyRachel Ignotofsky is a New York Times Best Selling author and  illustrator, based in beautiful Los Angeles. She grew up in New Jersey on a healthy diet of cartoons and pudding. She graduated from Tyler School of Art’s Graphic Design in 2011. Now Rachel works for herself and spends all day and night drawing, writing and learning as much as she can. Rachel is a published author with 10 Speed Press and is always thinking up new ideas. Check out her books The Wondrous Workings of Planet Earth Women In Science and Women In Sports. Her work is inspired by history and science. She believes that illustration is a powerful tool that can make learning exciting.  She has a passion for taking dense information and making it fun and accessible. Rachel hopes to use her work to spread her message about scientific literacy and feminism.

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