Tag Archives: Judaism

The Brave Cyclist: The True Story of a Holocaust Hero

Written by: Amalia Hoffman

Illustrated by: Chiara Fedele

For ages: 8-12 years old

Language: English and some Italian

Topics Covered: Judaism, WWII, Holocaust, Activism, Global Community, Historical Events, Historic Figure, Sports, Cycling. 

Summary: Gino Bartali was a small and sickly child, but he loved riding a bicycle more than anything else.  He got a part-time job at a bike shop to learn more, competed in his first race at the age of 12, but didn’t get his parents’ proper blessing to be a full-time professional cyclist until age 17.  Gino worked incredibly hard and in 1938 got a spot to compete in the Tour de France.  Even though he crashed his bicycle trying not to hit some spectators that decided to cross the road, Gino won! In his speech, he didn’t mention Mussolini who had taken control of Italy, and this angered the authorities.  Mussolini had teamed up with Adolf Hitler, and many years of hardship had begun.

When Gino returned home, he received a call from his good friend who also happened to be a cardinal and the archbishop of a church in Florence.  The cardinal had a plan to smuggle false papers into the country to help the Jewish folks assume non-Jewish identities for the duration of the war, keeping them safe from deportation to the concentration camps.  Gino doctored his bicycle frame to hide papers and went on long training rides back and forth through the mountains, shuttling papers back and forth to help the cardinal.

This is a fantastic book about a historical figure in multiple arenas!  We had never heard of Gino Bartali before reading this book, and are so glad his story was published.  After the story is finished there is an Afterword containing a photo of Gino and more detailed information about his life.  Overall, this is a fantastic book for elementary school students and we highly recommend it!

This book was sent to us by Capstone for consideration in the Best Books of 2019 List put on by the Read With River book club, but all opinions are our own!

About the Author & the Illustrator:

600F95C74AA-483A-43AE-862BEF470200BF66Amalia Hoffman an author/illustrator. Her board book, Dreidel Day is scheduled for publication by Lerners Publishing Group/ Kar Ben Publishing for Fall, 2018.
She also wrote and illustrated The Klezmer Bunch and Purim Goodies. (Gefen Publishing House) Both books were chosen as notable stories for children by the Association of Jewish Libraries. The Klezmer Bunch was selected by the Tony Award winning choreographer/producer, Elizabeth Swados for inclusion in her play, Jewish Books Cooking.
Amalia’s article, Queen Esther and Me, was published in the March 2016 issue of  Highlights Magazine for Children.
Amalia designed and illustrated Rose Bud, on oversized book with pop-up elements, created as prop for Israel’s children’s theater, The Train.
Amalia received the SCBWI portfolio award in the category of Fantasy in 2005. Her art was voted best at the illustration display in the 21st Century Children’s Nonfiction Conference in 2014 and she received 2nd place at the 2016 conference.
She actively promotes her books with entertaining presentations and was voted as
finalist in SCBWI storytelling competition.
Amalia is a teaching artist affiliated with ArtsWestchester. She is a member of SCBWI and Children’s Books Illustrator Guild.

22282107_1986392834938384_4822018181978824675_nFrom her website:

Hi,
I am Chiara
I was born in Milan in 1973. I live in a little village 50 km far from Milan where I live with my family and my pets.

I attended Art School in Milan and took a degree in Illustration at La Scuola del Fumetto in Milan. I had also attended several workshops with illustrators such as Gianni DeConno, Arcadio Lobato, Svjetlan Junakovic and a course with the publisher Paolo Canton (Topipittori) called Projecting Books.
I work mainly for children publishers all around the word, storyboarding for advertising and movie. Magazines. I use a combination of mixed traditional media and digital.
My artwork is varied and I feel my style is always evolving.

WORK EXPERIENCE
Freelance illustrator, editorial designer, storyboard artist for advertising and movies.

I work with big and small Publishers in Italy, Greece, USA, UK, France, Germany.

I am currently represented by  illustration Agency ASTOUND.US

Miep and the Most Famous Diary

Written by: Meeg Pincus

Illustrated by: Jordi Solano

For ages: 6-12 years

Language: English & very little German

Topics Covered: Historical Figures, Historical Events, Holocaust, Judaism, Global Community, WWII, Activism, Strength, Resilience. 

Summary: This book opens with Miep hearing the footsteps of Nazi soldiers, coming to arrest the 8 Jewish people that she’s been helping to hide in attic storage rooms for the past two years.  Miep manages to avoid arrest by realizing that she and the soldier are both from Vienna, and is left alone.  Miep is able to summon the courage to go upstairs to the secret annex where the Franks and others have been hiding, and she saves Anne’s diary.  She is able to hid the diary until the war is over and Mr. Frank returns, he is the only one that makes it out alive.  Eventually, the diary is published.

This book is somber, tender, and based on Miep’s autobiography.  It gives another facet of the WWII experience, this time from a non-Jewish activist committed to the anti-Nazi cause.  While the story of Anne Frank is well-known throughout the world, Miep’s story is lesser known.  In the back of the book is an author’s note, more information about Miep, and a timeline of her life.  She is a beautiful, courageous person.  Although she didn’t do any of the actions she’s famous for for glory, she did it to be a good person, not seeing herself as a hero but rather a person just doing her duty.  This is a beautiful book to add into any Holocaust education/curriculum, or world history learning.

This book was sent to us by Sleeping Bear Press as an entry in the Best Books of 2019 list, but all opinions are our own, as was the decision to review the book separately from the list project.

About the Author & the Illustrator:

Meeg Pincus 2018 headshot tightMeeg Pincus is a “kidlit nonfiction author. Humane educator. Book editor. Library lover. The happily book nerdy list goes on.

I have a lifelong passion for nonfiction books. Reading them, writing them, editing them. I’ve been writing & editing nonfiction in some form or another for over 20 years—and I still love it. (Learn more about my writing/editing background—and my much longer, full name—here.)

I’m also passionate about education & making our world a kinder, healthier place. This led me to the field of humane education: teaching people to be “solutionaries”—problem-solvers who help people, animals & the planet.

Nowadays I write “Solutionary Stories” for elementary-age children—nonfiction & informational books that inspire kids to make a difference.

I’m a former newspaper journalist & scholar-in-training (four years of graduate school in cultural studies/communication—focusing on race/class/gender—at UW-Madison & UC-San Diego). So I have a background in, and love for, research that means I dive deep & attempt to be incredibly accurate in every topic I write about.

And I’m grateful to have a diverse family (with a mix of religions, races, sexual orientations, gender identities, and abilities), so I’ve always incorporated diversity of many kinds into my writing. For me, part of being a solutionary is focusing first on compassion for all beings, and giving voice to those who are marginalized.

I’m active in SCBWI (San Diego chapter) and have participated in the Highlights Foundation Nonfiction Master Class, nonfiction workshops with the Writing Barn, 12×12, and more, to always keep improving my craft. I’m also the co-founder of 19PBbios, a promo group of 19 diverse picture book biographies releasing in 2019 from diverse creators.”

Solano_JordiJordi Solano was born in Barcelona and although he still lives there, he likes to visit and stay in almost every other country. He studied fine arts and illustration and has been illustrating books for the last ten years. Recent projects include Swimming with Sharks: The Daring Discoveries of Eugenie Clark; Beyond the Sixth Extinction; and iDoyle: The Interactive Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – A Scandal in Bohemia, an interactive book. Stories are his very favorite thing in the world: watching, reading, or telling them, so he’s very happy with the job he has.

Ezra’s BIG Shabbat Question

Written by: Aviva L. Brown

Illustrated by: Anastasia Kanavaliuk

For ages: 4-8 years

Language: English & Hebrew (glossary included)

Topics Covered: POC-Centric Narratives, Judaism, Family, Love, Education, Culture & Traditions, Global Community, Jewish Culture & Identity. 

Summary: This book is so great!  The world of children’s literature desperately needs more diversity, and this book fills several gaps.  Having more main characters of color, especially a family that is Jewish is much needed.  Ezra’s family is interracial, and celebrate Shabbat weekly.

Ezra is a bright, curious character.  He loves being Jewish, and asking questions.  One of his favorite days is Shabbat, because no one does any work.  This gets Ezra thinking, what is considered work?  Can knots be tied?  Can Ezra even tie his shoes on Shabbat??  Wandering around the house, Ezra asks each of his siblings his BIG question but none of them can enlighten him.  Ezra’s mother says she will look it up, and then his dad arrives home just in time for Shabbat.  His BIG question will have to wait!  The reader is introduced to a few vocabulary words and concepts related to Shabbat, as well as the blessing that Ezra’s mom sings.  The next morning, shoes still untied, Ezra is able to track down Rabbi Andy to ask his BIG question.  Rabbi Andy explains that people follow Judaism all over the world, and everyone interprets the rules a little differently.  This makes sense to Ezra, but he’s still unsure on if HIS family is allowed to tie knots, even temporary ones, on Shabbat.  As Ezra goes into the sanctuary for the start of services, he bumps into his dad who tells Ezra to tie his shoes.

This book does a great job of explaining the nuances of the religion, and presenting a simple question that adults may not consider but is very important to young people.  Another small side plot of this story we found particularly funny is that in the beginning Ezra wonders if the cat thinks in English, but in several places throughout the story we see thought bubbles above their two cats and they’re in fact NOT thinking in English!  This book does a fantastic job introducing a young audience to Judaism without knocking the reader over the head.  The story is believable, the illustrations are adorable, and the reader is left wanting to know what other BIG questions Ezra has.  We can’t wait to see what this author publishes next!

About the Author & the Illustrator:

web+bio+picAviva Brown and her children converted to Judaism in 2017, but during the preceeding years of Jewish study, she noticed a lack of diversity among Jewish children’s literature.  In late 2018, Aviva read a quote by author Beverly Cleary: If you don’t see the book you want on the shelf, write it.  So, she did.

In 2019, Aviva founded SpringLight Publishing to publish her books, with the goal of eventually publishing diverse picture books by other independent authors.

Aviva currently lives in North Carolina with her husband, two cats, and four wild animals who sometimes pretend they’re well-mannered children.  When she’s not writing, editing, or reading diverse kidlit, she can be found hiding from housework (well, you can try, but she’s super good at hiding), eating popcorn, or singing show tunes.

Screen Shot 2019-08-23 at 11.03.42 AMAnastasia Kanavaliuk is hard to find on the internet!  Her Instagram handle is here, and we think she’s so incredibly talented! 

Sound Off Saturday Featuring: Aviva Brown!

Happy Saturday!  We are SO EXCITED to be able to feature this powerhouse, Aviva Brown!  Aviva is one of the first people we “met” on Instagram when we started our account, and we’ve been keeping in regular contact ever since.  Aviva is knowledgable, funny, and definitely not afraid to laugh at herself as she shares funny life situations on her entertaining Instagram stories.  We are thrilled that she was able to publish her first book at the end of July, and see a shining bright future for her!  We hope you enjoy reading this interview, but make sure that after you’re done you go outside and enjoy some of this end of summer warm weather.

This is actually the first of 3 posts around Aviva and her new book!  Our next book review post on Tuesday is Ezra’s BIG Shabbat Question, and for our next Sound Off Saturday post, we were able to interview Aviva’s talented illustrator Anastasia!  Whew, we have to go lie in a hammock for a bit, it’s getting too exciting around here 😉  Tiny Activists, out!

The Tiny Activist: Introduce yourself/your organization!

IMG_3930Aviva Brown: Hey, peeps!  I’m Aviva Brown and I self-publish children’s picture books about Jewish kids of Color.  I’ve been married to my incredible spouse for 12 years and we have four amazing children that get on our nerves, cover us in kisses, and make our lives…unpredictable.  My oldest child is 11 and my youngest turns 1 in September. My children and I converted to Judaism in 2017, and my husband just finished his conversion in August 2019.

TTA: What are you passionate about?

AB: I’m passionate about so many things that I burned out on activism because I tried to do every. single. thing.  These days I’ve limited my focus to two areas–finding, reading, reviewing, and creating books about diverse populations, and working on immigration issues.  

I’m currently the chair of my synagogue’s Immigration Sub-Committee.  We’ve held an ID drive for undocumented immigrants, which many businesses and the police department in our small city will recognize as legitimate identification.  We partnered with a mostly Latinx Christian congregation for a program called Stranger 2 Neighbor, where we met several times in Fall 2018 to exchange information about our different cultures.  It went so well, we’ve kept in touch and are planning a community service project this fall.

imagesWe also maintain an Immigration Relief Fund, which congregants donate to, and partner with a local organization, Faith Action International House, to provide monetary relief to families who have had family members detained by ICE.  We’re also currently planning a trip this winter to Stewart Detention Center in Lumpkin, GA.

TTA: Tell us about a project you’re currently working on!

81WeUn5RNjLAB: My first picture book, Ezra’s BIG Shabbat Question, was just released July 30th, so I’m currently working on getting it on peoples’ radar and selling it.  I’ve also started work on my second book, Ora: Summer Camp Stowaway, already.  My goal is to release it in spring 2020.  I’m really excited to bring stories about Jews of Color to the children’s market.  Kids need to see themselves in books so that they know they matter. That’s my mission.

TTA: How can people support you on your journey?

AB: The easiest way to support my journey would be to purchase copies of my book. Ha!  However, I know that’s not possible for everyone. If you know someone who might be interested, though, tell them.  Follow my social media accounts and help me build an audience of like-minded parents, grandparents, and educators who understand how important diversity is in kids books.

TTA: What book was your favorite in 2019 so far?

91GKSSOobOLAB: My favorite children’s book this year is Lubna and Pebble.  It’s about a little girl who lives in a refugee tent city where her pebble is her only friend.  She eventually makes a human friend, and when it is time for her family to leave, she leaves Pebble with him.  Such a sweet story.

TTA: What are you looking forward to in The coming year?

AB: If I can pull it off, I hope to release two books in 2020, and mentor other self-publishing authors.  There were so many things I had to spend hours researching or learn on the fly.  If I can save another writer that research time, hopefully more people will add their voices and stories to the kidlit world.  We need them!

Keep Connected with Aviva!

Website

Instagram

Facebook

Sound Off Saturday- Featuring: Tyler Vile!

Happy Saturday! There’s a heat wave hitting us here in New England, so unless we venture to go swimming in the river later (which is also one of our favorite places to watch the sunset with a cold drink!) we will be inside all day!  We are so stoked to feature Tyler this week, who is a dear friend of ours.

Lee and Tyler experienced the highs and lows of their late teens and early twenties together in the squalid co-cops of the University of Maryland and have been best buds ever since 2013!


The Tiny Activist: So we know who you are, but can you introduce yourself/your organization for our readers?

TylerVile_NewBioPhoto_JustinTsucalas
Photo credit: Justin Tsucalas

Tyler Vile: Hi! My name is Tyler Vile and I’m a writer, performer, and organizer from Baltimore, Maryland! I’m a founding member of Hinenu: The Baltimore Justice Shtiebel, a radically inclusive synagogue. I write poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and I’m trying to get back into screenwriting and playwriting, and I’m learning to write scripts for comic books. Hinenu formed officially in 2017, and we often get asked what it means to be a radically inclusive synagogue as opposed to just inclusive. The best answer I can come up with is that we have disabled Jews, queer and trans Jews, Jews of color, and converts in our leadership, and we make our decisions entirely democratically. Many progressive synagogues will pay lip service to marginalized people’s needs and issues, but at Hinenu, we’re the ones making the decisions. We’re looking to the future right now with conversations about childcare, Hebrew school, and increasing learning opportunities for people of all ages and backgrounds. We pray together, we celebrate together, we protest together. It’s incredible to have seen this grow from a rough idea to where it is right now.

IMG_4523
Hinenu Members protesting against Migrant Concentration Camps

TTA: What are you passionate about?

TV: I’m passionate about so many things! Writing, of course, but also ritual, justice, human connection. My passions are a big motivator in my life. As a disabled person, it’s literally physically difficult to get out of bed sometimes. Everyone has to find that balance, that sweet spot between passion and rest. I have to remind myself all the time that it’s okay not to do everything I’m passionate about at once. Fear of missing out can be hard, but as long as you’re confident in what you’re doing long term, you don’t need to be at every show, every protest, or every event. 

TTA: Tell us about a project you’re currently working on!

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Cover of Shprintze and the Golem, written by Tyler and illustrator Avi Roberts

TV: Glad you asked! Right now, I’m working on a poetic reinterpretation of Bereshit (Genesis), the first book of the Torah. There’s so much in there that I think we take for granted. One thing I’ve learned in working with these ancient characters is that people really don’t change over thousands of years. There’s still jealousy, anger, hatred, and struggle, but there’s also still joy, humor, compassion, and liberation. I’m also working on a collection of sci-fi short stories about disabled characters and adaptive technology. I’ve always been a huge sci-fi fan and thought that we as disabled people live the most sci-fi lives, but we’re barely represented in the genre. When we are, it’s either as the villain or there’s a deus ex machina that fixes disability all together. I want to look at the consequences of “fixing” disability, the relationships we have with adaptive technology, and how disabled people are going to survive the climate crises that are headed our way. 

nothing-about-us-ricardo-levins-morales
Art based on the slogan used by South African disability rights and youth activists. By Ricardo Levins Morales.

TTA: How can people support you on your journey?

TV: You can make a tax deductible donation to Hinenu here if you feel so moved. My personal Paypal and Venmo are always open if you’d like to donate to the work I’m doing. You can buy my first book, Never Coming Home. While monetary donations help, they aren’t everything. If you’d like to book me for a poetry reading, writing workshop, or panel appearance, my email is authortylervile@gmail.com. Other than that, be good to the people around you, support local artists and activists.

I think the world is going to be saved by small actions, small organizations, and ordinary people doing extraordinary things. Think globally, act locally. Leave the world a little better than when you came in. That way, we can all support each other. 

TTA: What book was your favorite in 2019 so far?

 

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Cover of Making Spaces Safer by Shauna Potter

TV: It has to be Making Spaces Safer by my friend Shawna Potter. Shawna’s in a band called War on Women and is using her platform to make sure that public spaces are free from harassment and that everyone is afforded respect, dignity, and consent. I was a beta reader for that book and in offering feedback, I was blown away by how smoothly and directly she delivers some very necessary truths about the way we treat each other. I love the way she weaves other people’s narratives into the points she makes and invites readers to learn from what can go right as much as what can go wrong. 

TTA: What are you looking forward to in the coming year?

TV: The Jewish New Year is right around the corner! September will be here faster than you think. It’s not just about celebration, although that’s a big part of it, it’s a whole season of self-reflection, forgiveness, and accountability. What I love about it is that it acknowledges that hardship and joy are equally likely and that even when we’ve made mistakes and missed the mark, we’re still worth it and can grow and change. So, I’m looking forward to growing, learning, working on my book and all the things I don’t even know I’m going to love yet!

Thanks so much for having me, I love you guys and I can’t wait until the next time we see each other! 

Stay connected with Tyler!  


Tyler-Vile_eDonate to Tyler’s Paypal and Venmo

to support her work!


Check out Hinenu, and

make a tax deductible donation

to the organization here!


511ifw7qn2L._SX311_BO1,204,203,200_

Read Tyler’s first book,

Never Coming Home.


 

To book Tyler for a poetry reading, writing workshop, or panel appearance,

email her at: authortylervile@gmail.com

 

Sky-High Sukkah

Written by: Rachel Ornstein Packer

Illustrated by: Deborah Zemke

For ages: 4 years and up

Language: English and some Hebrew

Topics Covered: Judaism, Community, Holidays, Jewish Culture and Traditions, Friendship.

Summary: Leah has no place to build her Sukkah since they live in an apartment building. Ari is her best friend, and his parents don’t have any money for a sukkah. Luckily at Hebrew school, there is a poster contest and the prize is a real sukkah! Ari wins, and is so excited to tell his parents. Unfortunately, they say they can’t accept it because there is no storage space in their apartment but then Leah comes up with a plan that involves the whole community!

The neighborhood bands together to carry the pieces and cook food for everyone to enjoy, even the grocer on the corner surprises them with greenery and fruits for decorations! This book is an introduction to the community spirit of Sukkot, as well as camaraderie. Leah is not a passive observer. Rather, she provides the critical thinking it takes to solve problems and is an active doer when there are so many examples in other stories of female characters being passive. This book could be improved with a Hebrew glossary, but overall is a cute and fun story featuring a strong girl role model!

Reflection Questions:

  • How do you think the neighborhood felt when they worked together towards a goal?
  • Does your community celebrate Sukkot?
  • How have you helped others solve a problem that arose and impacted your community?

Continuing the Conversation:

  • Do you know all of the holidays that are celebrated in your neighborhood?  The first step to celebrating differences is gaining more knowledge!  Learn more about cultural events in your immediate community and why they are significant to those who celebrate.
  • Building things is fun!  Whether it’s a fort, Sukkah, or imaginary castle, it takes hard work.  Draw out plans for the structure of your dreams, it could be a hideout or something that would be a great addition to a playground for everyone to enjoy!

About the Author & the Illustrator:

993c59_f374e861817e46a8adcd5a628c0bfe78Rachel Ornstein Packer wasn’t always a writer. In fact, when she was in college, Rachel wanted to be a dancer. When Rachel got older, she became a social worker because she wanted to help her community. After Rachel had children, (their names are Leah and Ari-not a coincidence) she started writing. At first, she would write about food allergies because Ari was allergic to peanuts, tree nuts and eggs. Rachel wrote many articles for newspapers, magazines, and blogs, mostly about recipes for families with allergies.  However, Rachel always had a dream about writing my own children’s book.  In fact, Sky High Sukkah didn’t start out with that title. It changed FOUR times! It took a long time to find the right home for her book and Rachel is so glad that she had persistence because here she is-FINALLY.

6a00e54fb51001883401b8d1287656970c-800wiDeborah Zemke has illustrated over forty books! Deborah has also written eight books. Some are made with gouache paint on paper, and some are made with digital pixels. All are made with enthusiasm. If you’ve ever wondered how to draw a quokka, you can find out in the book, Doodle A Zoodle . Frogs are another favorite critter for her to draw. See one frog’s story in this Critter Crackup for Ranger Rick magazine. Deborah likes the alphabet! Here are some of her favorite letters. Some of the publishers that Deborah has worked with include Dial Books for Young Readers, Creston Books, Blue Apple Books, Ranger Rick magazine, Dutton Children’s Books, Grosset & Dunlap, Handprint Books, Houghton Mifflin, Andrews McMeel, National Wildlife Federation, Scholastic/Children’s Press, Sterling Publishing, and Workman Publishing.

 

 

The Shofar Must Go On…

Written by: Lina Schwarz

Illustrated by: Yong Chen

For ages: 4 years and up

Language: English

Topics Covered: Family, Love, Religion, Jewish Culture & Traditions, Problem-Solving, Community. 

Summary: It is almost Rosh Hashanah and Harry is missing his mother, a talented trumpeter, who is out of town playing a concert. Even more unfortunate is Harry’s father, who always blows the shofar at their synagogue, is sick and can’t play it this year.

When Harry’s mother returns, he gets an idea. She is the one that blows the shofar at their temple to ring in the new year, and Harry thinks maybe it is time for him to start to practice the shofar as well!

This book, much like Sky-High Sukkah is an introduction to a Jewish holiday. It explains the importance of the holiday and the ram’s horn shofar as a significant piece of that. While Harry’s mom is not named in the book and several other adult male characters are, having a female character be able to perform an important honor for the holiday proceedings is a breath of fresh air.

Reflection Questions:

  • How do you think Harry feels when his mom is out of town?
  • Would you feel proud if one of your family members were so good at doing something that they got invited lots of different places?
  • Blowing the shofar at synagogue seems like a very special event, how would you feel if you were asked to do so?

Continuing the Conversation:

  • Is there a large Jewish population in your community?  If so, the shofar might be a well-known object to you!  If so, how can you use your knowledge to help others that might be unfamiliar with Rosh Hashanah?  If you’re the unfamiliar one, where can you find out more information?
  • Learn about other musical instruments that are used for either holidays or other special occasions.  How are they made and when are they used during special events?  If possible, take a field trip to a local instrument shop and learn more in-depth about how instruments are made.

About the Author & the Illustrator:

Author Lina Schwarz keeps a very low profile online and we can’t find anything out them!  If you have any leads, let us know!

yong_2018Yong Chen is the illustrator for this book! Before Yong Chen immigrated to the United States, he was a high school art instructor and science teacher. After immigrating to the United States in 1989, Yong studied graphic design, painting and illustration in Boston, and earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design and his Master of Fine Arts from the University of Hartford.

Yong is a published author, illustrator and painter. He has illustrated/authored children’s books and children’s magazines. His oil and watercolor paintings have been exhibited in art galleries and museums both in China and United States. He is also a pioneer of teaching painting using online technology for college students and through his website EnjoyingArt.com.