Tag Archives: pets

Mrs. Bibi’s Elephant

Written & Illustrated by: Reza Dalvand

For ages: 3-5 years

Language: English

Topics Covered: Community Involvement, Friendship, Pets, Family, Chosen Family, Empathy, Economics, Social-Emotional Learning. 

Summary: Mrs. Bibi has a pet elephant, and they spend all of their time together.  The elephant loved playing with the children in the streets, and drinking tea with Mrs. Bibi, listening to stories.  The others in the town are disturbed by the close friendship, they don’t understand why Mrs. Bibi would want a pet instead of fancy objects.  The townspeople decide to send the elephant to the zoo.  Heartbroken, Mrs. Bibi tucks her elephant into bed and makes a plan. It’s quite anti-capitalist, and we’re all about that! Mrs. Bibi doesn’t care about objects, she cares about the companionship that her elephant brings.

The ending of this book is unique (sorry, we can’t spoil it!).  Typically in books there is an apology conversation and a rectifying of the situation.  I actually really like the ending, it’s surprising.  Mrs. Bibi and her elephant decide to leave town because they’re not valued in the community, and because the others in town prefer stock markets and fancy chandeliers over friendships and pets.  When she and her elephant leave, the children are sad and eventually the town does realize that having pets and forming meaningful community connections are better than material objects.  Will the beloved pair come back? Place your bets now, this book will be out soon!

This book was sent to us by Flying Eye Books, but all opinions are our own.  The book will be available in April 2020!

About the Author & Illustrator:

Dalvand_Reza_swReza Dalvand was born in 1989 in the Iranian city of Andimeshk. As a child he had but one idea in his head: to draw. After studying graphic design at Isfahan University of Art, he completed a master’s degree in illustration at the University of Tehran. He has published more than 15 picture books in Iran, Europe, and Asia. He is a member of the Iranian Society of Illustrators and has participated in many national and international exhibitions from countries around the world, including UK, Japan, Iran, Korea, Italy, UAE, Ukraine, and Surbia, and his work was showcased at the Bologna Book Festival in 2018. Reza lives in Tehran.

Tanna’s Owl

Written by: Rachel & Sean Qitsualik-Tinsley

Illustrated by: Yong Ling Kang

For ages: 4 years and up

Language: English, some Inuktitut (pronunciation guide in back as well)

Topics Covered: First Nations, Residential Schools, Own Voices, Responsibility, Pets, Growing Up, Indigenous Voices. 

Summary: 

This is a lovely book based on author Rachel’s own life experience raising an owl.  Tanna, or main character, receives an owlet from her father one day with instructions to care for it and make sure it has everything it needs.  Tanna jumps at the chance initially, but becomes a bit worn down when Ukpik the owl requires more and more attention without any affection given in return.  It is a wild animal, after all.

We were drawn into this story, with its unique and truthful outlook.  This book acknowledges that Tanna doesn’t always feel like raising Ukpik is rewarding, and that is refreshing.  At the end of the summer, Tanna must return to school (leaving Ukpik behind), which upon reading the Author’s Note the reader learns that she is educated at a Residential School.  When she returns the next summer, Ukpik has learned to fly and isn’t there anymore.  Tanna has a lot of respect for the owl, and is glad that she helped it thrive despite not always being excited to wake up early to catch lemmings for it to eat, or clean up all the poop.

I really loved how Inuit cultural values were woven into this story, and coupled with own voices lived experiences from Rachel’s childhood.  This story emphasizes the value of hard work and appreciation for nature, it’s a fantastic real aloud for young people who might be expressing interest for a pet as well!

This book was sent to us by Inhabit Media, but all opinions are our own!

About the Author & the Illustrator:

Qitsualik-TinsleyOf Inuit-Cree ancestry, RACHEL QITSUALIK-TINSLEY was born in a tent on northernmost Baffin Island. She learned Inuit survival lore from her father, surviving residential school and attending university. In 2012, she was awarded a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for numerous cultural writings. Of Scottish-Mohawk ancestry, SEAN QITSUALIK-TINSLEY was born in southern Ontario, learning woodcraft and stories from his father. Training as an artist, then writer, Sean’s sci-fi work won 2nd place at the California-based Writers of the Future contest, published by Galaxy Press. Rachel and Sean have worked for decades as Arctic researchers and consultants. In writing together, they have published 10 successful books and many shorter works, celebrating the history and uniqueness of Arctic shamanism, cosmology, and cosmogony. Their novel, Skraelings: Clashes in the Old Arctic, was a Governor General Awards Finalist and First Prize Burt Award winner.

 

Yong Ling Kang is a full-time freelance illustrator. Having worked in animation studios and a publishing company for some years, she’s now living and working from home based in Toronto.  Raised in tropical Singapore, she find comfort in playing water sports, taking walks in green spaces, and savouring spicy food. A glass of milo peng / teh-c siu-dai anytime!

 

Reading Beauty

Written by: Deborah Underwood

Illustrated by: Meg Hunt

For ages: 3-6 years

Language: English

Topics Covered: POC-Centric Narratives, Literacy, Fairy Tale, Problem-Solving, Feminist, Independent Thought, Kindness, Family, Love, Pets, Space, Rhyming. 

Summary: This is the next book from the pair that brought you Interstellar Cinderella, which we loved very much!  Both of us are so excited to get this one, we’ve been waiting with bated breath for it to arrive at our local library.

Princess Lex loves to read!  On the morning of her 15th birthday she wakes up to find that all the books in the kingdom are gone, removed because of a curse that was put upon Lex at her birth.  In order to get her beloved books back, she sets off to find the fairy that cursed her.

This book is great, not only do we see a princess and kingdom that is predominantly POC,  but Lex herself takes initiative to solve the problem of the kingdom’s curse-and uses books to do it! When she does find the fairy that cursed her, Lex treats her with kindness.  A lovely book, with a feminist twist of true love’s kiss!

About the Author & the Illustrator:

60356-2Deborah Underwood has worked as a street musician and at an accounting firm but for years has been a full-time writer who occasionally plays the ukulele. She is the author of several picture books, including New York TimesbestsellersThe Quiet Book and Here Comes the Easter Cat, as well as Monster & Mouse Go Camping, Interstellar Cinderella, and Bad Bye Good By

 

 

 

 

megbio-2Meg Hunt is an illustrator, educator and maker of things. She lives and works in the wooded city of Portland, OR. Her goal is to fill the world with my creations, and make people happy in the process. Her first picture book Interstellar Cinderella was published by Chronicle Books in 2015 and has been given starred reviews from Booklist and Publisher’s Weekly, who also listed it as one of their best summer books of the year. She was featured as one of Publisher’s Weekly’s Flying Starts for Summer 2015 as well. In 2015, she received a Gold Medal from the Society of Illustrators for Illustrators 58, Uncommissioned category. Currently, her focus is creating charming and colorful character-based illustrations, lettering and patterns for editorial/publishing/product markets.

A Stone for Sascha

Written & Illustrated by: Aaron Becker

For ages: 5 and up

Language: English

Topics Covered: Family, POC-Centric Narratives, Loss, Grief, Historical Fiction, Love, Pets.

Summary: This book actually has no words, just pictures.  A family loses their dog, Sascha, just before going on vacation.  While on vacation at the beach, one of the children finds a shiny gold rock.  Suddenly, the reader is transported back throughout history and sees just exactly how the gold rock got into the water.  The gold rock takes many forms and uses throughout history, before finally ending up at the bottom of the sea and being found washed up near the shore.  The gold is then used to decorate the grave of Sascha.

This book is a beautiful reminder of how life cycles keep moving throughout the rise and fall of societies.  Inanimate objects have many lives before coming into ours, and remembering the past can be a beautiful memory.

Reflection Questions:

  • How do you think the main characters feel when they have to go on vacation without their beloved pet?
  • Is it easy to tell what’s happening in the story without words?
  • What’s your favorite moment in time that’s depicted in the book?
  • When is a time that you were grieving, and what made you feel better?
  • How could you help a friend that is feeling sad, or a sense of loss?

Continuing the Conversation:

  • Write a letter to someone you miss.  It can be someone that is no longer with you, maybe they moved away or have passed on.  It’s important to release feelings, even if the person the letter is addressed to will never read it.
  • Think about an object you’ve found.  What do you think it’s story is? Draw a comic strip about how the object came to be, and how it got to you!

About the Author & the Illustrator:

Aaron_Becker,_Author_and_Illustrator,_aaron_beckerYears ago, after working as a designer in San Francisco’s dot-com craze, Aaron Becker quit his job and headed to Monterey, California for a children’s book conference. At the time, Aaron had a vague idea of why he thought it’d be fun to write and illustrate books. After presenting some hazy ideas to a guest editor from Candlewick Press, he left the conference content to wander. Aaron traveled. He returned to art school and earned his chops. Aaron worked in the Bay Area with some of his heroes in film design for nearly a decade. But eventually, the children’s book bug returned. This time, Aaron had some real drawing skills and a much greater understanding of why these books might matter. After all, Aaron had his own child by this time, and it was becoming clear to him that there’s no purer form of story-telling for an illustrator than creating their own book full of pictures. Luckily, children seem to like this kind of stuff. And publishers will go along with it as well if the idea is up to snuff. When Aaron’s agent gave him the good news that his first book had a solid offer, the name of the editor sounded eerily familiar. It was none other than the same editor he had met in Monterey nearly fifteen years before.

Aaron now lives in Amherst, Massachusetts where every day, he returns to that place of being a kid again, ready to fly into outer space with a ship of his own design. He’s fortunate to have a job that lets me keep doing this, and would imagine that even in the darkest of his creative slumps, surely this must beat astronaut boot camp.